Legislation & Public Policies

Respect the Rights of Children and Youth

November 22, 2018 / Toronto – OCASI – Ontario Council of Agencies Serving Immigrants is deeply concerned about the Ontario government’s decision to eliminate the position of the Ontario Child Advocate.

Children and youth in this province will no longer have an independent, non-partisan voice that puts their rights and well-being first. Ontario joins Prince Edward Island and the North West Territories as the only jurisdictions in Canada without an independent voice for children and youth.

Ontario Workers Deserve Respect and Dignity: OCASI Statement on Bill 47

November 20, 2018 / Toronto - OCASI – Ontario Council of Agencies Serving Immigrants calls on the government of Ontario to treat workers with respect and dignity by withdrawing Bill 47 and restoring proactive workplace inspections for compliance with the Employment Standards Act.

OCASI is the umbrella organization for immigrant and refugee serving agencies in Ontario and the collective voice for the sector, with 234 member agencies located in communities across the province.

Advancing Decent Work

November 2018

It has been a very busy last few weeks as we prepared for and welcomed over two hundred sector leaders to our biennial Executive leadership conference; and marked forty years of OCASI’s policy advocacy, activism and sector development with a successful gala. It was a time of celebration, of congratulatory remarks, and acknowledgement of the resiliency of the sector and the impact it has had on the lives of tens of thousands of refugees, (im)migrants and Canadians. We laughed, we danced and we debated and we learned.

Concerns: Ministry of Border Security and Organized Crime Reduction

OCASI joined civil society organizations to express concerns and questions about the newly-created Minister of Border Security and Organized Crime Reduction.

In an Open Letter to the Prime Minister civil society organizations from across Canada described concerns and questions regarding the establishment of the new and unprecedented Minister of Border Security and Organized Crime Reduction. The letter points out the following:

Refugee Claimants - Frequently Asked Questions

Type: 

Asylum seekers (in Canada use the term refugee claimant) have the legal right to cross the border and enter Canada to make a refugee claim. Asylum seekers are crossing irregularly – between ports of entry - but that is not illegal. They are doing so to because the Safe Third Country Agreement (2004) between Canada and the United States requires Canada to send refugee claimants back to the U.S., with a few exceptions. The Safe Third Country Agreement applies only to refugee claims made at border crossings.

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